Research and society

How photonics is dramatically changing the medical world

Fotonica

The medical field is on the verge of a revolution, all thanks to... light. Medical devices will soon become so small and inexpensive that they will become part of everyday equipment. The driving force behind this technological revolution is photonics. ‘It is the fastest growing ‘‘enabling” technology we know’, says Roel Baets, head of the Photonics Research Group.

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“Decolonisation MUST begin at the university”

Humanities Academy

Public debate about decolonisation has become extremely lively, especially in the aftermath of the Black Lives Matter protests. But the story is still far from over. The call for decolonisation is becoming increasingly louder, and raises important questions about far more than the symbolic discussions focussing upon folkloric characters such as 'Zwarte Piet'. What about reading lists? Museums? The way in which we teach?

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Everyone a conspiracy theorist?

complotdenken

At the moment, it seems that a real boom in conspiracy theories has been unleashed. How is it possible that a completely new virus emerged from nowhere, causing so many deaths? Many believe that it has to be part of a wider conspiracy. The internet continues to be swamped with all sorts of conspiracy theories. Which raises the question: why do so many people believe in the most improbable stories, and why do we have a problem with that?

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Participative research connects scientists with society

Baccarne bezig met participatief onderzoek

Scientific research can often provide solutions to social challenges. But is society sufficiently involved in the process? Participative research, in which there is active involvement of the people concerned or those for whom the research is being done, allows researchers to be better connected with the community. It is also the subject of the inspiration dag for researchers that is organized by the IDC's on 1 October 2021.

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Professor Veerle Cnudde leaves no stone unturned

Veerle Cnudde

Professor Veerle Cnudde’s smartphone is full of photos of old, weathered stones. Mostly of natural stones, used in the construction of old buildings like the Gravensteen, as the aim of her research is to better protect the stones – and therefore the buildings too. Because “if you simply leave them in their current condition, over time there won’t be much left.”

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Why is doping not allowed at the Olympics in Tokyo?

Peter Van Eenoo

The Doping Control Lab at Ghent University is an international authority in the field of doping research. The lab will be sending a delegation to the Olympics in Tokyo this year, just like it did during previous editions. But why is this necessary? Why aren’t athletes free to choose what they do with their own body? DoCoLab’s manager, prof. Peter Van Eenoo, sheds some light on these questions.

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