Research and society

The landscape as a trail to missing soldiers from WWI

Landschap

After the First World War, tens of thousands of soldiers remained missing in the earth in the Westhoek. Some are now recovering their identity at the In the Flanders Fields Museum. Ghent University archaeologist, Birger Stichelbaut, teamed up with Ghent University alumnus, Simon Verdegem, to lay the foundations for the captivating exhibition. The result of excavation work and archaeology from the air.

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Suicide prevention game nominated for Belgian Game Awards

Silver

April 2021 saw the launch of Silver – a serious game with the aim of helping young people learn about mental health. Now, just a few months later, the game has been nominated for the Belgian Game Awards. We reflect on the journey so far, and discuss the next steps with Eva De Jaegere, who helped develop and do research for Silver.

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Climate tower in DR Congo fills an enormous gap in our knowledge

Klimaattoren

Deep in the Congolese rainforest stands a tower 57 metres high that is helping in the fight against climate change. Since October 2020, the Ghent University climate tower has been measuring both the amount of CO2 captured and stored by the tropical rainforest and the levels of water exchange between the forest and the atmosphere. “It is a unique structure, the first of its kind in the region”, says Professor Pascal Boeckx.

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Already giving up on those New Year’s Resolutions? This is how to keep them

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To do a bit more sport, to eat a healthier diet and to try to put a bit more money aside. There is a good chance that you made some sort of list of good resolutions on 1st January this year, but that already, that list has become little more than a statement of good intentions. That’s not unusual, according to Professor Emelien Lauwerier. But the good news is that it’s still not too late to pick it up again, simply by adjusting your approach.

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How to make a ‘neglected tropical disease’ a priority

Cysticercose

Cysticercosis is a little-known disease, which can lead to epilepsy and much worse. Annually, it causes the death of 28,000 people. Particularly in Africa, although it is discovered here too on some occasions. Pork tapeworm is the culprit. Professor Sarah Gabriël and her team are tackling this tapeworm and the havoc it causes. “However, everything depends on the governments’ resources and priorities.”

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striking

What if trees could talk? Well, every so often they do. In doing so, they give a glimpse of the past. For example, a 250-year-old oak in the castle grounds at Elverdinge near Ypres tells us more about the First World War. The tree survived this war, despite the incessant bombs. The Woodlab at Ghent University tells us the touching story of this oak tree.

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Data as the lifebuoy in a flood

Regen

As the climate changes we must increasingly account for heavy rainfall and the flooding this causes. Having said that, there is already lots of data available to predict future flooding and potential damage. Yet our approach is not always aligned with this data.

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